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Stars Screen Binge Culture Media. Tech Innovate Gadget Mission: Ahead Upstarts Innovative Cities. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Personal trainer Drew Manning went from being ideal to overweight for his "Fit 2 Fat 2 Fit" campaign. Story highlights The new male ideal does not reflect the typical American male A revival of standards is making men more comfortable with their appearance and masculinity The swimmer's physique, a long, lean look, is becoming the new ideal.

Drew Manning thought he had the body of the ideal man: His perfectly chiseled body was hairless due to regular "manscaping. As for working out, he indulged in his favorite activity for only about 45 minutes a day, four to five days a week.

Then, Manning's once impressive muscles softened to pounds of bloated fat -- on purpose. Manning, a personal trainer, decided to gain nearly 70 pounds so he could better understand how his clients feel. He then planned to lose the weight to show that no matter the numbers they faced, others could get fit, too. He called it his " Fit 2 Fat 2 Fit " campaign, and documented it on a blog, and a book that debuts in June.

He expected some physical discomfort, but the emotional struggle -- and judgment from others -- surprised him. As he loaded sugary cereals and soft drinks from his cart at the local grocery store one day, he caught three women staring at him, then sliding their eyes to the food he was buying. I used to be a fit guy, not the fat guy,'" Manning wanted to turn around and explain.

There was a total lack of confidence in the way I felt in public because I wasn't the fit guy anymore. The female form has long been the topic of discussions about self-esteem, but what about men? Their ideas about weight, body image and self-esteem have been largely swept under the ambiguous rug of masculinity. Meanwhile, changing standards about the ideal male form can leave them overwhelmed and exhausted by the chase for perfection, too.

Men don't talk about it as much, health experts say, but that doesn't mean they're not thinking about it, whether they're ultra-fit or kind of fat. As a professor for 17 years and counting, Addis has observed how the male college students in his classes have changed and adapted to shifting cultural norms. In recent years, more of them spend time in the gym, focus on their appearance and monitor body mass.

Most aren't trying to lose weight -- they're documenting their physique, he said. It's a far cry from the male celebrities of the s -- think Spencer Tracey or Robert Mitchum -- who wore their heftiness as a sign of financial success or a way to demonstrate masculinity, Addis said.

Some psychologists and trend watchers said the male muscle obsession only grew during the last few years. As the economy struggled, men were sent looking for aspects of their lives they could define and control. Body image is, at times, the only thing. It can create this obsessiveness," said Sarah Toland, senior health editor for Men's Journal.

James Mahalik, a psychology professor at Boston College, said some men develop powerful, physically intimidating bodies as a display of masculinity in face of threats. But becoming a father pushes some men to lead healthier lives -- and as a consequence, develop a healthier-looking body, too. But in a world of changing ideals and rising obesity rates, what is it they're all idealizing? Lately, big and bulky has been pushed to the wayside, and the swimmer's physique reigns supreme, editors of men's magazines and websites say.

The male silhouette landing on magazine covers and action flicks is tall, lean, agile and fit. It's a physique that's more attainable for most men than the beefy-torso-and-chicken-leg look of the past. They want to look great, but they don't want to look like they spend too much time on it -- but they know they need to spend time on it. Nygaard points to actor Ryan Reynolds as an example of making the effortless look like an art form -- always the right amount of scruff and perfectly tousled hair, even if they use a beard trimmer to shave down scruff and pomade for the slept-in look.

Rather than the clothes themselves, it is the fit that displays the effort they put into their appearance, and this is showing up in the workplace as well. This is the result of what some call the "'Mad Men' revival" -- the return of pomade, polish and of the perfectly cut suit. It stays within the boundaries of masculinity while offering men the option of looking their best. Current trends might make topics like health and grooming more approachable for men while promoting a healthier ideal, but psychologists Mahalik and Addis don't expect body image to become a big topic among guys.

As he put on 70 pounds as part of his experiment, he said he often received e-mails from "typical American men," former high school and college athletes who stopped caring for their health and bodies after school or marriage. Manning said he believes they fell prey to the "masculine marketing" of fast food and beer. He said he realizes now how obsessed he was with a physical ideal, and what it feels like to be so many pounds away from it; Manning is still taking the weight off.

His friends, family and wife understood he wouldn't be overweight forever. But he has gained empathy for his personal training clients, and a new understanding of strangers who stared at a man approaching pounds.

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Burn The Fat Body Transformation System - Tom Venuto

There are almost no striations or vascularity in any muscle groups. Typically there will be a little bit of fat on the stomach, but it will not be rounded. Any range above this is considered obese in most men. The waist size starts to increase and the stomach shows rounding. There may still be little neck fat, but most men gain weight in their stomachs first. The fat starts to distribute around the body and the waist will look larger relative to the hips.

The stomach will be noticeably more round and chin fat will start to form. The stomach will start to gain more and more fat around it, and usually be over 40 inches. The stomach will have clear protrusion and hang. Male Body Fat Percentage: The stomach will continue to grow and the chest will gain more fat. Women have more fat in breast tissue, waist, and thigh areas. This is the range you will usually see bodybuilders in, and is not considered healthy to keep consistent.

Muscles are clearly defined and separated, and vascularity is noticeable all over the body. The hips, thighs, and butt usually have less shape because of the lack of body fat.

Many bikini and fitness models are usually within this range, as there is still a clear definition in the muscles. Vascularity is usually only in the arms and some in the legs, and there is still separation between muscles.

The separation between muscles, as well as the definition in the muscles becomes less apparent. This is the range that most female athletes fall in, and is considered as highly fit. There is some definition in the abs, but usually the arms and legs start to lose muscle definition. This is the range that most women fall into, as is not too slim or overweight. Curves begin to form in the hips as there is more body fat around the thigh and butt.

As women begin to gain weight, instead of it going to their stomach, it will begin to show around the hips, thighs, and butt. In this range, the butt and thighs will be more rounded and pronounced. At this level of body fat, the face and neck will begin to gain some fat. There was a total lack of confidence in the way I felt in public because I wasn't the fit guy anymore.

The female form has long been the topic of discussions about self-esteem, but what about men? Their ideas about weight, body image and self-esteem have been largely swept under the ambiguous rug of masculinity. Meanwhile, changing standards about the ideal male form can leave them overwhelmed and exhausted by the chase for perfection, too. Men don't talk about it as much, health experts say, but that doesn't mean they're not thinking about it, whether they're ultra-fit or kind of fat.

As a professor for 17 years and counting, Addis has observed how the male college students in his classes have changed and adapted to shifting cultural norms. In recent years, more of them spend time in the gym, focus on their appearance and monitor body mass. Most aren't trying to lose weight -- they're documenting their physique, he said. It's a far cry from the male celebrities of the s -- think Spencer Tracey or Robert Mitchum -- who wore their heftiness as a sign of financial success or a way to demonstrate masculinity, Addis said.

Some psychologists and trend watchers said the male muscle obsession only grew during the last few years. As the economy struggled, men were sent looking for aspects of their lives they could define and control. Body image is, at times, the only thing.

It can create this obsessiveness," said Sarah Toland, senior health editor for Men's Journal. James Mahalik, a psychology professor at Boston College, said some men develop powerful, physically intimidating bodies as a display of masculinity in face of threats. But becoming a father pushes some men to lead healthier lives -- and as a consequence, develop a healthier-looking body, too.

But in a world of changing ideals and rising obesity rates, what is it they're all idealizing? Lately, big and bulky has been pushed to the wayside, and the swimmer's physique reigns supreme, editors of men's magazines and websites say.

The male silhouette landing on magazine covers and action flicks is tall, lean, agile and fit. It's a physique that's more attainable for most men than the beefy-torso-and-chicken-leg look of the past.

They want to look great, but they don't want to look like they spend too much time on it -- but they know they need to spend time on it. Nygaard points to actor Ryan Reynolds as an example of making the effortless look like an art form -- always the right amount of scruff and perfectly tousled hair, even if they use a beard trimmer to shave down scruff and pomade for the slept-in look.

Rather than the clothes themselves, it is the fit that displays the effort they put into their appearance, and this is showing up in the workplace as well. This is the result of what some call the "'Mad Men' revival" -- the return of pomade, polish and of the perfectly cut suit.

Ask five women what their ideal male build is and you'll get six different insists that they only like guys who look like they're 3% body fat. But Shelton appears to be the only fat-faced man who has won with a of admirable things before they ever have to be good-looking, if at all. Just like women, each man carries his weight differently, particularly when it comes to fat and muscle. That's why, even if two men are the exact.